Dan Brown – Inferno – Book Review

Review of: Inferno
book by:
Dan Brown
Price:
$15.87 or £7.00

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On February 3, 2014
Last modified:February 4, 2014

Summary:

I'd recommend this book even to people who don't like Dan Brown's previous books, because I think he has developed the art of thriller fiction even more in Inferno, in that it's very different to his other books, but at the same time furthers the same winning formula of posing these puzzling circumstances and questions and getting you desperate to know the answers.

inferno

This book is another brilliant read from Dan Brown. Dan Brown’s book are often what people say you either love or hate, because of his twisting of history, sort of parading as the truth, many people don’t like this aspect of him detailing history to suit a fictional plot, I think this is short-sighted, the book is there to entertain readers, not be a factual record of real history, which in itself is pointless to try to revolve a plot around because of the many varying opinions on truth, that in itself is the beauty of doing a fictional book on the “possibility” of historic intrigue.

I couldn’t put this book down, as with some of Dan Brown’s other books. As usual he manages to weave in a lot of specific details that draw you into the world of art history and also promote your interest, what he details doesn’t have to be 100% factually true, but its the fact he brings these topics to popularity that is the real achievement. By making a thrilling novel on these messages left through Dante’s work, many of which are factual, he manages to make art history relevant in way that it can be really admired by more than it would usually be admired by.

Unlike many books I read, I couldn’t predict the way the story would develop, and that in itself is one of the reasons I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book, in a way the narrative is guiding you by hand down the systematic problem solving on the main character, but at the same time its posing a lot questions and thoughts on the nature of society. I think this is probably the best book he has written so far in the Robert Langdon world, because of the fact it weaves in art history and modern concerns at the same time, rather than just being about a thrilling chase or problem solving almost detective novel.

I’d recommend this book even to people who don’t like Dan Brown’s previous books, because I think he has developed the art of thriller fiction even more in Inferno, in that it’s very different to his other books, but at the same time furthers the same winning formula of posing these puzzling circumstances and questions and getting you desperate to know the answers.

I'd recommend this book even to people who don't like Dan Brown's previous books, because I think he has developed the art of thriller fiction even more in Inferno, in that it's very different to his other books, but at the same time furthers the same winning formula of posing these puzzling circumstances and questions and getting you desperate to know the answers.

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